Army of Vandals


An Art Film written and directed by MissMe, produced by the PHI Center, as well as a semi-permanent art installation at the PHI Center.

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We are not going to wait for your permission.

We don’t need your permission.

To regain the territory of our value and power, We are going to take back what has been robbed from us: our own bodies.

To claim it, in it’s pure form: nudity.

It is our vessel, and NOT an object of desire for the Other.

This is our Army.
— MissMe
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Sex has always been used by traditional societies as a way to control and shame women. An excuse to package and preserve us from and for the gaze of strangers.

Even though Feminism has brought us a very long way, we still have miles to conquer. Most of the distance deeply rooted in both men's and women’s mentality and subconscious. 

The Portrait of a Vandal is an unapologetic soldier. The battle is one of regaining what is primarily ours.

To be born with a woman's body is to bear the unsolicited burden of humanity's unresolved attitudes towards sex.

She learns to adapt to a patriarchal system that blames women for the misbehaviour of men. She’s taught to be ashamed of her sexuality and apologize for the power of her body.

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